Accordion Content
  
  • ​​​​​​For each unit of coursework, count 1 hour in the classroom and 2 hours of homework every week. A 12 unit course load equals a 36 hour/week commitment.
  • It's recommended that full-time students work a maximum of 20 hours per week.
  • Factor in extra time for transitions. How long will it take to get from the classroom to the parking lot or from your job to campus? Also, even if your work shift officially starts at 9 a.m. plan on being there 10 minutes early and staying a few minutes after your shift ends. Employers do not like it when employees rush in at the last minute and rush out again.​
  
  • ​​​Plan your search around your current schedule, then ask what kind of flexibility they have in scheduling. Most employers who work with college students understand that their availability will fluctuate but ask how much notice is needed for schedule changes and when they need the most help. Offer to work those hours if you can.
  • Aside from school and work, what are your other obligations? ​Complete a weekly schedule planner​, making sure to allow time for sleeping, eating, commuting and all other regular activities.
  
  • This is where a budget is very important. Just like you examined how many hours you spend on routine things like sleeping and eating, it’s important to be aware of all your regular expenses, plus the money you are putting away for the future. Here is a great budget calculator.
  • Most of us would probably answer, "As much as possible!" But it's important to work with real numbers. What is your earning potential? As of January 1, 2018, $10.50/hour will be the minimum wage for employees of companies with fewer than 25 workers. A student working 20 hours per week could expect to earn $210 before taxes and deductions. Estimate your own take-home pay with this paycheck calculator. Keep scrolling down the page for more information about how payroll taxes are calculated.

  
  • Will you drive your own car, or share/borrow with someone else? What would you do if this arrangement changed?
  • Do you know the public transportation routes to your new employer?

  
  • ​Check with Financial Aid​ if you are not sure. Most on-campus jobs for students are limited to those who are eligible for FWS. Under FWS, a student applies for and is employed at a particular part-time job at Citrus College. They earn a paycheck like any other job. The Financial Aid Office is located in the Student Services Building, first floor.

  
  • ​You don't have to have a long employment history to answer this. It can be as simple as "I am good with numbers," or "I find it easy to talk to people" or "People are always telling me how organized I am." Think back on some personal or academic projects that turned out well and that you found challenging and rewarding while you were doing them. You'll probably find that your skills and strengths were what you used to achieve satisfying results.
  
  • ​While it's true that flexibility can improve your chances of getting hired, there needs to be a balance so that the job you get is the one you want to keep. Do you like being in constant motion or do you keep a mellower pace?
  
  • ​Keep a permanent record of this information handy so you can quickly reference it when completing job applications.
  
  • Most jobs in retail or food service don't require you to wear business attire to an interview but do make sure your appearance sends the message you want. (See the Interviewing Guide for more information.)​
  
  
  • ​If you can answer "yes" to all of the above you are well on your way to a great interview! Check out the Interviewing Guide​ and learn how to package it all together.
  
  • ​​Get a local map and note the location of all potential employers.​

  • Job search websites? Sure, just remember most employers don't advertise. If you apply to one of these you will be competing with everyone else who found that same posting. You are much more likely to succeed if you do your own research. Ask your friends, family, neighbors, teachers, classmates and anyone else in your circle if they know of a great place to work. See the networking page​ for more great tips.

  • Apply in person (wear your outfit discussed in the question above​). Make a personal connection with the hiring manager whenever possible. Don't rely on an online application to do your talking for you.

  • Try to find a less busy time of day (e.g. avoid applying at a restaurant during meal times or at a retail store on Black Friday). Ask, "Who can I speak to about applying for a job?" Not, "Are you hiring?"

  • Local businesses get a lot busier when school is in session. They may start "staffing up" a month or so before school starts. Don’t wait until classes start; many positions will be filled already.

  • Be prepared to be interviewed on the spot. Know your availability, why you chose to apply there, know your class schedule, how many hours/week you are looking for, your skills, your qualifications.
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